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Audio books available through the Taylor Community Library:

“Killer Instinct”

by James Patterson

The murder of an Ivy League professor pulls Dr. Dylan Reinhart back onto the streets of New York, where he reunites with his old partner, Detective Elizabeth Needham. As the worst act of terror since 9/11 strikes the city, a name on the casualty list rocks Dylan’s world. Is his secret past about to be brought to light? As the terrorist attack unfolds, Elizabeth does something courageous that thrusts her into the media spotlight. She’s a reluctant hero. Thanks to the attention, she also becomes a prime target for the ruthless murderer behind the attack. Dylan literally wrote the book on the psychology of murder, and he and Elizabeth have solved cases that have baffled conventional detectives. Soon the sociopath they’re facing this time is the opposite of a textbook case. There’s no time to study for the test he’s about to give them. If they fail, then they fail not only themselves, but everyone and everything around them.

“Cilka’s Journey”

by Heather Morris

Cilka is just 16-years-old when she is taken to Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp where the commandant immediately notices how beautiful she is. Forcibly separated from the other women prisoners, Cilka learns quickly that power equals survival. When the war is over and the camp is liberated, freedom is not granted to Cilka. She is charged as a collaborator for sleeping with the enemy and sent to a Siberian prison camp. Did she actually have a choice? Where do the lines of morality lie for Cilka, who was sent to Auschwitz when she was still a child? Once in Siberia, she faces challenges both new and horribly familiar, including the unwanted attention of the guards. When she meets a kind female doctor who takes her under her wing and begins to tend to the ill in the camp, struggling to care for them under brutal conditions. Confronting death and terror daily, Cilka discovers a strength she never knew she had. When she begins to tentatively form bonds and relationships in this harsh, new reality, she finds that despite everything that has happened to her, there is room in her heart for love.

“Criss Cross”

by James Patterson

In a Virginia penitentiary, Alex Cross and his partner, John Sampson, witness the execution of a killer they helped convict. Hours later, they are called to the scene of a copycat crime. A note signed “M” rests on the corpse. “You messed up big time, Dr. Cross.” Was an innocent man put to death? Alex soon realizes he may have much to answer for, as “M” lures the detective out of the capital to the sites of multiple homicides, all marked with distressingly familiar details that conjure up old cases. Details that conjure up Cross family secrets. Details that make clear that M is after a prize so dear that were the killer to attain it, Alex would no longer have a reason to live.

“The Dog Who Knew Too Much”

by Krista Davis

America’s favorite dog comes to pet-friendly Wagtail for some rest and relaxation, but Holly quickly discovers that this perfect pup is a total scamp who takes every opportunity to run off and misbehave. During an outdoor treasure-hunting game, the star dog and Trixie, Holly’s beloved Jack Russell terrier, stumble across a dead body. Holly has more than murder to worry about, though, when a man shows up after reading an article featuring Trixie in a magazine and claims that he is the dog’s rightful owner. Holly will need to prove that she is her pup’s only parent and catch a killer to restore peace to her pet-loving happy place.

“Final Opinion”

by Clive Cussler

Juan Cabrillo and his team of expert operatives board the Oregon, one of the most advanced spy ships ever built. Soon they are faced with new challenges and nemeses as they undertake another dangerous mission. But this time who will be the victor?

“Finding Chika”

by Mitch Albom

Chika Jeune was born three days before the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti. She spent her infancy in extreme poverty, and when her mother died giving birth to a baby brother, Chika was brought to The Have Faith Haiti Orphanage that Albom operates in Port Au Prince. With no children of their own, the 40-plus children who live, play, and go to school at the orphanage have become family to Mitch and his wife, Janine. Chika’s arrival makes a quick impression. Brave and self-assured, even as a 3-year-old, she delights the other kids and teachers. At age 5, Chika is suddenly diagnosed with something a doctor there says, “No one in Haiti can help you with.” Mitch and Janine bring Chika to Detroit, hopeful that American medical care can soon return her to her homeland. Instead, Chika becomes a permanent part of their household, and their lives, as they embark on a two-year, around-the-world journey to find a cure. As Chika’s boundless optimism and humor teach Mitch the joys of caring for a child, he learns that a relationship built on love, no matter what blows it takes, can never be lost.

“The Fountains of Silence”

by Ruta Sepetys

Under the fascist dictatorship of General Francisco Franco, Spain is hiding a dark secret. Meanwhile, tourists and foreign businessmen flood into Spain under the welcoming promise of sunshine and wine. Among them is 18-year-old Daniel Matheson, the son of an oil tycoon, who arrives in Madrid with his parents hoping to connect with the country of his mother’s birth through the lens of his camera. Photography - and fate - introduce him to Ana, whose family’s interweaving obstacles reveal the lingering grasp of the Spanish Civil War - as well as chilling definitions of fortune and fear. Daniel’s photographs leave him with uncomfortable questions amidst shadows of danger. He is backed into a corner of difficult decisions to protect those he loves. Lives and hearts collide, revealing an incredibly dark side to the sunny Spanish city.

“Get a Life, Chloe Brown”

by Talia Hibbert

Chloe Brown is a chronically ill computer geek with a goal, a plan and a list. After almost dying, she’s come up with seven directives to help her “get a life,” and she’s already completed the first by moving out of her glamorous family’s mansion. The next items: Enjoy a drunken night out, ride a motorcycle, go camping, have meaningless but thoroughly enjoyable sex, travel the world with nothing but hand luggage and do something bad. It’s not easy being bad, even when you’ve written step-by-step guidelines on how to do it correctly. What Chloe needs is a teacher, and she knows just the man for the job. Redford Morgan is a handyman with tattoos, a motorcycle, and more sex appeal than the average man. He’s also an artist who paints at night and hides his work in the light of day, which Chloe knows because she spies on him occasionally. When she enlists Red in her mission to rebel, she learns things about him that no spy session could teach her. Like why he clearly resents Chloe’s wealthy background, and why he never shows his art to anyone. What really lies beneath his rough exterior and will he be able to help Chloe attain her goals?

“If You Tell”

by Gregg Olsen

After more than a decade, when sisters Nikki, Sami and Tori Knotek hear the word mom, it, triggers memories that have been their secret since childhood, until now. For years, behind the closed doors of their farmhouse in Raymond, Washington, their sadistic mother, Shelly, subjected her girls to years of unimaginable abuse, degradation, torture and psychic terrors. Through it all, Nikki, Sami and Tori developed a defiant bond that made them far less vulnerable than Shelly imagined. Even as others were drawn into their mother’s dark and perverse web, the sisters found the strength and courage to escape an escalating nightmare that culminated in multiple murders. This is a story of absolute evil and the freedom and justice that the sisters risked their lives to fight for. Sisters forever, victims no more, they found a light in the darkness that made them the resilient women they are today.

“Invitation Only Murder”

by Leslie Meier

Lucy Stone is at it again. She doesn’t know what to expect as she arrives on a private Maine island owned by eccentric billionaire Scott Newman, only that the exclusive experience should make for a very intriguing feature story. Scott has stripped the property of modern conveniences in favor of an extreme eco-friendly lifestyle. A trip to Holiday Island is like traveling back to the 19th century, and it turns out other residents aren’t exactly enthusiastic about living without cell service and electricity. Before Lucy can get the full scoop on Scott, she finds one of his daughters dead at the bottom of a seaside cliff. The young woman’s tragic end gets pinned as an accident, but a sinister plot unfolds when there’s a sudden disappearance. Now stuck on an island with murder suspects galore, the simple life isn’t so idyllic after all. Now, Lucy must tap into the limited resources around her to outwit a cold-blooded killer or she just might end up next on his list.

Jeanie Sluck is director of the Taylor Community Library.