Article Tools

Font size
+
Share This
EmailFacebookTwitter

Photo: N/A, License: N/A

New audio books available at the Taylor Community Library.

“The Orphan’s Tale” by Pam Jenoff

Sixteen-year-old Noa has been cast out in disgrace after becoming pregnant by a Nazi soldier and being forced to give up her baby. She lives above a small rail station, which she cleans in order to earn her keep. When Noa discovers a boxcar containing dozens of Jewish infants bound for a concentration camp, she is reminded of the child that was taken from her. In a moment that will change the course of her life, she snatches one of the babies and flees into the snowy night. She finds refuge with a German circus, but she must learn the flying trapeze act so she can blend in undetected, spurning the resentment of the lead aerialist, Astrid. At first rivals, they soon forge a powerful bond but soon must decide whether their friendship is enough to save one another, or if the secrets that burn between them will destroy everything.

“Queen Bee” by Dorothea Benton Frank

Beekeeper Holly McNee Kensen quietly lives in a world of her own on Sullivan’s Island, tending her hives and working at the local island library. Holly calls her mother The Queen Bee because she’s a demanding hulk of a woman. Her mother, a devoted hypochondriac, might be unaware that she’s quite ill but that doesn’t stop her from tormenting Holly. To escape the drama, Holly’s sister Leslie married and moved away, wanting little to do with island life. Holly’s escape is to submerge herself in the lives of the two young boys next door and their widowed father, Archie. Her world is upended when Leslie returns and both sisters fixate on what’s happening in their neighbor’s home. Is Archie really in love with that awful ice queen of a woman? If Archie marries her, what will become of his little boys? Restless Leslie is desperate for validation after her imploded marriage, squandering her favors on any and all takers. Their mother ups her game in an uproarious and theatrical downward spiral. Scandalized, Holly is talking to her honey bees a mile a minute, as though they’ll give her a solution to all the chaos, but, who knows, they just might.

“Redemption” by David Baldacci

Amos Decker and his FBI partner Alex Jamison are visiting his hometown of Burlington, Ohio, when he’s approached by an unfamiliar man. He instantly recognizes the man’s name Meryl Hawkins. He’s the first person Decker ever arrested for murder back when he was a young detective. Though a dozen years in prison have left Hawkins unrecognizably aged and terminally ill, one thing hasn’t changed, he maintains he never committed the murders. Could it be possible that Decker made a mistake all those years ago? As he starts digging into the old case, Decker finds a startling connection to a new crime that he may be able to prevent, if only he can put the pieces together quickly enough.

“Run Away” by Harlan Coben

You’ve lost your daughter. She’s addicted to drugs and to an abusive boyfriend. She’s made it clear that she doesn’t want to be found. Then, by chance, you see her playing guitar in Central Park. But she’s not the girl you remember. This woman is living on the edge, frightened, and clearly in trouble. You don’t stop to think. You approach her, beg her to come home. She runs and you do the only thing a parent can do, you follow her into a dark and dangerous world you never knew existed. Before you know it, both your family and your life are on the line. In order to protect your daughter from the evils of that world, you must face them head on.

“Someone Knows” by Lisa Scottoline

Allie Garvey is heading home to the funeral of a childhood friend. Allie is not only grief-stricken, she’s full of dread. Going home means seeing the other two people with whom she shares an unbearable secret.

Twenty years earlier, a horrific incident shattered the lives of five teenagers, including Allie. Drinking and partying in the woods, they played a dangerous prank that went tragically wrong, turning deadly. The teenagers kept what happened a secret, believing that getting caught would be the worst thing that could happen. Time has taught Allie otherwise, not getting caught was far worse. Allie has been haunted for two decades by what she and the others did, and by the fact that she never told a soul. The secret has eaten away at her, distancing her from everyone she loves, including her husband. She wasn’t punished by the law, Allie has punished herself, and it’s a life sentence. Now, Allie stands on the brink of losing everything. She’s ready for a reckoning, determined to learn how the prank went so horribly wrong. She digs to unearth the truth, but reaches a shocking conclusion that she never saw coming.

“Summer of ‘69” by Elin Hilderbrand

It’s 1969, and for the Levin family, the times they are a-changing. Every year the children have looked forward to spending the summer at their grandmother’s historic home in downtown Nantucket. Like so much else in America, nothing is the same. Blair, the oldest sister, is marooned in Boston, pregnant with twins and unable to travel. Middle sister Kirby, caught up in the thrilling vortex of civil rights protests and determined to be independent, takes a summer job on Martha’s Vineyard. Tiger is an infantry soldier, recently deployed to Vietnam. Thirteen-year-old Jessie suddenly feels like an only child, marooned in the house with her out-of-touch grandmother and her worried mother, each of them hiding a troubling secret. As the summer heats up, Ted Kennedy sinks a car in Chappaquiddick, man flies to the moon, and Jessie and her family experience their own dramatic upheavals along with the rest of the country.

“Sunset Beach” by Mary Kay Andrews

Drue Campbell’s life is adrift. Out of a job and down on her luck, life doesn’t seem to be getting any better when her estranged father, Brice Campbell, a personal injury attorney, shows up at her mother’s funeral after a 20-year absence. Worse, he’s remarried, to Drue’s eighth grade frenemy, Wendy, now his office manager, and they’re offering her a job. It seems like the job from hell, but the offer is sweetened by the news of her inheritance, her grandparents’ beach bungalow in the sleepy town of Sunset Beach, a charming but storm-damaged eyesore now surrounded by waterfront McMansions. With no other prospects, Drue begrudgingly joins the firm, spending her days screening out the grifters whose phone calls flood the law office. Working with Wendy is no picnic either. When a suspicious death at an exclusive beach resort nearby exposes possible corruption at her father’s firm, she goes from unwilling cubicle rat to unwitting investigator, and is drawn into a case that may or may not involve her father. With an office romance building, a decades-old missing person’s case re-opened, and a cottage in rehab, one thing is for sure at Sunset Beach there’s a storm on the horizon.

“What Happens in Paradise” by Elin Hilderbrand

One year ago, Irene Steele had the shock of her life a loving husband, father to their grown sons and successful businessman, was killed in a plane crash. That wasn’t Irene’s only shattering news, he’d also been leading a double life on the island of St. John, where another woman loved him, too. Now Irene and her sons are back on St. John, determined to learn the truth about the mysterious life—and death—of a man they thought they knew. Along the way, they’re about to learn some surprising truths about their own lives, and their futures.

“Wolf Pack” by C.J. Box

The good news is that Joe Pickett has his job back, the bad news is that he’s come to learn that a drone is killing wildlife and the drone belongs to a mysterious and wealthy man whose son is dating Joe’s own daughter, Lucy. When Joe tries to lay down the rules for the drone operator, he’s asked by the FBI and the DOJ to stand down, which only makes him more suspicious. Meanwhile, bodies are piling up in and around Joe’s district in shocking numbers. He begins to fear that a pack of four vicious killers working on behalf of the Sinaloa cartel known as the Wolf Pack has arrived. Their target seems to be the mystery man and everyone including Joe, Nate, and others who are associated with him. Teaming up with a female game warden to confront these assassins, Joe finds himself in the most violent and dangerous predicament he’s ever faced.

“G-Man” by Stephen Hunter

The Great Depression was marked by an epidemic of bank robberies and outlaws who became household names. Hunting them down was the new U.S. Division of Investigation, soon to become the FBI. Determined to nab the most dangerous gangster this country has ever produced, Baby Face Nelson, the Bureau recruited talented gunman Charles Swagger, World War I hero and sheriff of Polk County, Arkansas. Eighty years later, Charles’s grandson Bob Lee Swagger uncovers a strongbox containing an array of memorabilia dating back to 1934 including a federal lawman’s badge, a .45 automatic, a mysterious gun part, and a cryptic diagram all belonging to Charles Swagger. Bob becomes determined to find out what happened to his grandfather and why his own father never spoke of Charles. As he investigates, Bob learns that someone is following him. Someone who shares his obsession.