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New audio books at the Taylor Community Library:

“Galileo’s Dream” by Kim Stanley Robinson

To the inhabitants of the Jovian moons, Galileo is a revered figure whose actions will influence the subsequent history of the human race. From the summit of their distant future, a charismatic renegade named Ganymede travels to the past to bring Galileo forward in an attempt to alter history and ensure the ascendancy of science over religion. And if that means Galileo must be burned at the stake, so be it. From Galileo’s heresy trial to the politics of far-future Jupiter, the parallels between a distant past and an even more remote future are illuminated, in the process celebrating the human spirit and calling into question the convenient truths of our own moment in time.

“Shadowfever” by Karen Marie Moning

MacKayla Lane was just a child when she and her sister, Alina, were given up for adoption and banished from Ireland forever. Twenty years later, Alina is dead and Mac has returned to the country that expelled them to hunt her sister’s murderer. After discovering that she descends from a bloodline both gifted and cursed, Mac is plunged into a secret history, an ancient conflict between humans and immortals who have lived concealed among us for thousands of years.

What follows is a shocking chain of events with devastating consequences, and now Mac struggles to cope with grief while continuing her mission to acquire and control a book of dark, forbidden magic scribed by the mythical Unseelie King, containing the power to create and destroy worlds. Who can she turn to? Who can she trust? Who is the woman haunting her dreams? But most important, who is Mac herself and what is the destiny she glimpses in the black and crimson designs of an ancient tarot card?

“Give Me Your Hand” by Megan Abbott

Kit has risen to the top of her profession and is on the brink of achieving everything she wanted. She hasn’t let anything stop her. Now someone else is standing in her way, Diane. Best friends at seventeen, their shared ambition made them inseparable. Until the day Diane told Kit her secret, the worst thing she’d ever done, the worst thing Kit could imagine and it blew their friendship apart. Kit is still the only person who knows what Diane did. Now Diane knows something about Kit that could destroy everything she’s worked so hard for. How far would Kit go, to make the hard work and sacrifice worth it in the end? What wouldn’t she give up? Diane thinks Kit is just like her. Maybe she’s right.

“The Tangled Tree” by David Quammen

In the mid-1970s, scientists began using DNA sequences to reexamine the history of all life. Perhaps the most startling discovery to come out of this new field—the study of life’s diversity and relatedness at the molecular level. This book chronicles these discoveries through the lives of the researchers who made them such as Carl Woese, the most important little-known biologist of the twentieth century; Lynn Margulis, the notorious maverick whose wild ideas about “mosaic” creatures proved to be true; and Tsutomu Wantanabe, who discovered that the scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a direct result of horizontal gene transfer, bringing the deep study of genome histories to bear on a global crisis in public health. He explains how molecular studies of evolution have brought startling recognitions about the tangled tree of life, including where we humans fit upon it.

“Murder Being Once Done” by Ruth Rendell

When a young girl’s body is found in a London cemetery and the local police, under the command of Inspector Wexford’s nephew, are baffled, Wexford decides to brave his doctor’s wrath and the condescension of the London police by doing a little investigating of his own. This is a story of mysterious identity and untimely death.

“Nemesis” by Lindsey Davis

In the high summer of A.D. 77, Roman informer Marcus Didius Falco is beset by personal problems. Newly bereaved and facing unexpected upheavals in his life, it is a relief for him to consider someone else’s misfortunes. A middle-aged couple who supplied statues to his father, Geminus, have disappeared under mysterious circumstances. They had an old feud with a bunch of notorious freedmen, the Claudii, who live rough in the pestilential Pontine Marshes, terrorizing the neighborhood. When a mutilated corpse turns up near Rome, Falco and his friend Petronius investigate, even though it means traveling in the dread marshes. Just as they are making progress, the Chief Spy, Anacrites, snatches their case away from them. As his rivalry with Falco escalates, he makes false overtures of friendship, but fails to cover up the fact that the violent Claudii have acquired corrupt protection at the highest level. Making further enquiries after they have been warned off can only be dangerous, but when did that stop Falco and Petronius?

“The Midwich Cuckoos” by John Wyndham

In the sleepy English village of Midwich, a mysterious silver object appears and all the inhabitants fall unconscious. A day later the object is gone and everyone awakens unharmed, except that all the women in the village are discovered to be pregnant. The resultant children of Midwich do not belong to their parents all are blond and golden eyed. They grow up too fast and their minds exhibit frightening abilities that give them control over others and brings them into conflict with the villagers just as a chilling realization dawns on the world outside

“The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul” by Douglas Adams

When a check-in desk at London’s Heathrow Airport disappears in a ball of orange flame, the event is said to be an act of God. ”But which god”,“ wonders Detective Dirk Gently. How is this connected to Dirk’s battle with his cleaning lady over his filthy refrigerator or to the murder of his latest client? Are these events just another stretch of coincidences in the life of the world’s most off-kilter private investigator?

“Ambush” by James Patterson

An anonymous tip about a crime in Upper Manhattan proves to be a setup. An officer is taken down but despite the attackers’ efforts, it’s not Michael Bennett. One of Bennett’s children sustains a mysterious injury. And a series of murders follows, each with a distinct signature, alerting Bennett to the presence of a professional killer with a flair for disguise. Bennett taps his best investigators and sources, and they fan out across the five boroughs, but the leads they’re chasing turn out to be phantoms. The assassin takes advantage of the chaos, enticing an officer into compromising Bennett, then luring another member of Bennett’s family into even graver danger. Michael Bennett can’t tell what’s driving the assassin, but he can tell it’s personal, and that it’s part of something huge. Through twist after twist, he fights to understand exactly how he fits into the killer’s plan, before he becomes the ultimate victim.